Tag Archives: German solar feed-in tariffs

This Week In Green Energy: The Solar Shuffle

Week of:  March 22, 2010 – March 26, 2010

Solar Millennium is not in trouble, its finances are solid and it only hired an auditing firm to dispel ongoing negative market rumors surrounding the German solar company. In essence, that’s what the company’s flacks told G.E.R. in an email response to questions we sent them several days ago.

A number of questions do, however, surround the company. Obviously, it’s never a good sign when a high-profile CEO resigns 75 days into the job. That’s what happened two weeks ago, when Utz Claassen suddenly stepped down. A few days later, the company hired Deloitte to review its books.  A few days after that announcement, Solar Millennium appointed Chief Financial Officer Thomas Mayer as its CEO.

To recap the past two weeks, Solar Millennium has lost a newly appointed CEO, begun a five-year audit of its financial performance and appointed a new CEO.

Continue reading This Week In Green Energy: The Solar Shuffle

February Top Ten Players in Green Energy

Green Energy Reporter’s ranking of the top ten players in green energy for the month of February is 

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This Week In Green Energy: Wheres The Money? …In Washington!

Capitol Building -- Washington DC

For cleantech companies Washington has become a crucial financial partner.

In the post-Lehman/global financial meltdown era it’s been repeatedly said that the money power has left Wall Street for the shores of the Potomac in Washington.

This is not just a talking point, but a stark reality for whole industries — the renewable energy sector among them– which have come to rely on Washington for their mid-to-long-term survival.

The government’s pivotal role as a funder of last and first resort was glaringly apparent this week with the announcement that BrightSource Energy was offered a $1.37 billion loan guarantee (if it meets certain conditions) from the Department of Energy. The BrightSource loan guarantee dwarfs the $535 million thin-film photovoltaic cell maker Solyndra got last year, which, until now, was the largest such loan guarantee. Continue reading This Week In Green Energy: Wheres The Money? …In Washington!

This Week In Green Energy: Where?s The Money? ?In Washington!

Capitol Building -- Washington DC

In the post-Lehman/global financial meltdown era it’s been repeatedly said that the money power has left Wall Street for the shores of the Potomac in Washington.

This is not just a talking point, but a stark reality for whole industries — the renewable energy sector among them– which have come to rely on Washington for their mid-to-long-term survival.

The government’s pivotal role as a funder of last and first resort was glaringly apparent this week with the announcement that BrightSource Energy was offered a $1.37 billion loan guarantee (if it meets certain conditions) from the Department of Energy. The BrightSource loan guarantee dwarfs the $535 million thin-film photovoltaic cell maker Solyndra got last year, which, until now, was the largest such loan guarantee. Continue reading This Week In Green Energy: Where?s The Money? ?In Washington!

January Top Ten Players in Green Energy: Nos 1-5

Green Energy Reporter’s ranking of the top ten players in green energy for the month of January is out! Taking the lead for the January ranking are British Prime Minister Gordon Brown and his Energy and Climate Change Secretary Ed Miliband (#2 last month). These two are implementing bold green strategies whose impact will be felt well after they leave office, and based on recent polls, showing Conservative leader David Cameron well ahead of  Brown, that could happen soon.

Our latest ranking also includes promising companies prepping for possible IPOs as well as on investors putting their money, where so far only a few have….  One such investor is Microsoft founder and Chairman Bill Gates, who last month announced he was spending $4.5 million on various geoengineering projects. This is a risky proposition but not a  surprising one coming from someone who dropped out of Harvard to launch the startup that’s become Microsoft!

As we like to remind you, every time we publish out ranking, our top- ten list is based on the players’ influence over green energy policy and their ability to move the debate. Other factors that we take into account in making our monthly selection include industry and popular support for their positions, access to capital to fund innovation and the success of their ventures.

1: British Prime Minister Gordon Brown/Secretary of State for energy and Climate Change Ed Miliband

British Prime Minister Gordon Brown and Ed Miliband, UK secretary of state for energy and climate change

From small-scale to ginormous-scale, British politicians rolled out complex plans in the last month to put the country on track to meet 15 percent of its energy needs from renewable sources by 2020. First, they announced a ?75 billion ($120 billion) offshore wind project – the so-called Round Three program administered by the independent Crown Estate – that will put thousands of turbines on the country’s seabed. Nine separate consortia won contracts to build the projects. The projects could support 70,000 jobs by 2020, according to Brown.

Then, just this week,  Ed Miliband announced new feed-in tariffs for small-scale and home producers of renewable energy. Homeowners could be paid hundreds of pounds from electricity they generate, even if they use it themselves, Miliband said.

Of course, there are enormous challenges, from lack of manufacturing plants that could actually build these offshore turbines to limited offshore connections to the national electricity grid. There’s also the simple matter of getting citizens to buy into green energy. But these projects show ambition that is distinctly lacking elsewhere in the world.

Image: PA

Continue reading January Top Ten Players in Green Energy: Nos 1-5