Tag Archives: Bloom Box

Bloom Energy Hires New Executive To Oversee Path To Commercialization

George Nguyen has joined fuel cell developer Bloom Energy, a company spokesperson emails G.E.R. Nguyen, the company’s first chief operations officer, will create and implement?processes in view of commercializing the Bloom Box, the oxide fuel cell Bloom has been developing for the past eight years.

Continue reading Bloom Energy Hires New Executive To Oversee Path To Commercialization

February Top Ten Players in Green Energy

Green Energy Reporter’s ranking of the top ten players in green energy for the month of February is 

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This Week In Green Energy: Wheres The Money? …In Washington!

Capitol Building -- Washington DC

For cleantech companies Washington has become a crucial financial partner.

In the post-Lehman/global financial meltdown era it’s been repeatedly said that the money power has left Wall Street for the shores of the Potomac in Washington.

This is not just a talking point, but a stark reality for whole industries — the renewable energy sector among them– which have come to rely on Washington for their mid-to-long-term survival.

The government’s pivotal role as a funder of last and first resort was glaringly apparent this week with the announcement that BrightSource Energy was offered a $1.37 billion loan guarantee (if it meets certain conditions) from the Department of Energy. The BrightSource loan guarantee dwarfs the $535 million thin-film photovoltaic cell maker Solyndra got last year, which, until now, was the largest such loan guarantee. Continue reading This Week In Green Energy: Wheres The Money? …In Washington!

This Week In Green Energy: Where?s The Money? ?In Washington!

Capitol Building -- Washington DC

In the post-Lehman/global financial meltdown era it’s been repeatedly said that the money power has left Wall Street for the shores of the Potomac in Washington.

This is not just a talking point, but a stark reality for whole industries — the renewable energy sector among them– which have come to rely on Washington for their mid-to-long-term survival.

The government’s pivotal role as a funder of last and first resort was glaringly apparent this week with the announcement that BrightSource Energy was offered a $1.37 billion loan guarantee (if it meets certain conditions) from the Department of Energy. The BrightSource loan guarantee dwarfs the $535 million thin-film photovoltaic cell maker Solyndra got last year, which, until now, was the largest such loan guarantee. Continue reading This Week In Green Energy: Where?s The Money? ?In Washington!

Clean Energy Bloom Boxes Still Have a Dirty Side

Amidst the ber hype surrounding the release of Bloom Energy’s Bloom Box, we came across this insightful and sobering post by Mark Boslet, co-editor of TechPulse 360, a Silicon Valley news site that chronicles the innovation and companies defining the clean-tech industry.

Coca-Cola expected five Bloom boxes will help it cut the carbon footprint of an Odwalla plant by 35 percent.

In the gush of enthusiasm for Bloom Energy’s new energy box, one topic has received scant attention: its environmental impact.

The hype is that the new Bloom Energy Server is ready to save the world, to generate electricity without producing greenhouse gases. It is not quite that simple.

When most people think of fuel cells Bloom hut-sized device is in fact a fuel cell they think of hydrogen cells, which consume hydrogen and oxygen and produce heat and water. Very clean.

The Bloom Box is different. It requires oxygen and a fuel, such as natural gas, methane or biofuel. So while it generates electricity without combustion, it does produce the greenhouse gas CO2.

At a coming out event Wednesday morning, Bloom argued the box’s emissions were substantially less than those of a traditional power plant. Hence the claim of clean energy.

But it is a matter of degrees. Bloom says its new 100 kW box is 67 percent cleaner than a coal-fired plant, the dirtiest of the traditional electric plants. To drive home this point, it offered testimony from its first Fortune 500 customers.

Coca-Cola, for instance, has five boxes it intends to install at its Odwalla plant in California. The Energy Servers will run on biogas, generate 30 percent of the facility’s power and cut its carbon footprint by 35 percent. Coca was the most detailed.

Bank of America plans to use five Bloom boxes to run a call center in Southern California. The units will replace diesel generators and cut carbon emissions, though the company didn’t say exactly how much.

On its Web site, Bloom aims to be more specific. Customers will cut CO2 emissions by 40 percent to 100 percent, depending on the fuel they use, and virtually eliminate sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxide and other smog-forming emission. A biofuel would likely equate to the 100 percent claim, though it, too, would produce CO2.

Looked at another way, says Bloom, since the Energy Servers first appeared at customer sites in July 2008, they have generated more than 11 million kilowatt hours of electricity and reduced CO2 by about 14 million pounds.

That’s an important step. But alone it wouldn’t solve the climate crisis.

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What to Expect from Austin and Beyond… Bloom Box, John Kerry and Ed Miliband

Today, we are in Austin, Texas (and no, we’re not attending South by Southwest, that’s next month) for Renewable Energy World’s North America Conference. The agenda includes a mix of technical discussions (one panel is entitled “Overcoming Supply Chain Challenges to Wind Power in the U.S.”) and panels looking at U.S. renewable energy policy and access to development capital. Continue reading What to Expect from Austin and Beyond… Bloom Box, John Kerry and Ed Miliband